London LASEK

(PRK)

What is LASEK / PRK Laser eye surgery?

PRK stands for photorefractive keratectomy. It can be used to treat short sightedness (myopia), long sightedness (hyperopia) and astigmatism.

LASEK is a variation of PRK but essentially both are described as surface laser techniques and unlike LASIK, they do not involve creating a flap in the cornea. This treatment is less commonly performed nowadays compared to LASIK mainly due to the longer recovery time. However, in certain cases, it is the most suitable procedure.

LASEK & PRK eye surgery with Dr. Mearza at Vision Correction London

How does it work?

Your eyes see by allowing light to enter through the cornea (the front part of the eye) and focus on the retina. The information is then communicated to the brain via the optic nerve.

If you need glasses or contact lenses to see clearly, it’s usually because you have eyeballs that are either too long or too short in relation to the size of the cornea. Longer eyeballs result in short sightedness or myopia, while shorter eyeballs result in long sightedness, or hyperopia.

During the treatment at Vision Correction London your corneas are reshaped with precision accuracy so that light will focus directly on your retinas. A few days after the procedure, you will be able to see again, without the need for glasses or contact lenses.

Some history

Some history

PRK was the first laser eye surgery procedure, licensed in 1995. In 1999, the more popular LASIK procedure was licensed, offering patients less discomfort and a faster recovery time. However, LASIK isn’t always appropriate, so it’s important that laser eye clinics still offer PRK.

LASEK laser eye surgery treatment

FAQ’s for LASEK

Who is suitable?

While LASIK is the most commonly performed elective surgery worldwide, it’s not suitable for everyone. For people in need of vision correction who also have corneas less than 0.5mm thick, or have corneal scarring, this treatment is usually the best option.

All the conditions that can be treated with LASIK can also be treated with this procedure, namely short sightedness, long sightedness and astigmatism.

What happens during the procedure?

The surgery is performed under local anaesthetic eye drops and typically takes around 10 minutes. A small amount of alcohol is inserted onto a micro-well that sits on the cornea for 30 seconds. This denatures the top layer of the cornea (epithelium) which is then retracted back to reveal the corneal bed. Then a computer-guided laser removes a pre-set amount of corneal tissue and corrects the shape of your cornea, enabling it to focus light directly on the retina.

The final part of the procedure is replacing the denatured epithelial layer, which is held in place by a contact lens. This layer is then replaced over a few days with new epithelium formed from the edges of the cornea.

What happens during the PRK procedure?

PRK is performed in exactly the same way, except that the removed epithelial layer is discarded completely rather than replaced. It was thought that replacing the epithelial top layer rather than discarding it improved pain levels and recovery time but several studies have shown that this is not the case. With PRK the results in terms of pain levels and recovery times have been shown to be no different.

How long will it take for my eyes to recover?

With this procedure there is a longer recovery time than after LASIK. Initial visual recovery can take up to one week, and it can be several weeks before your eyes have recovered fully and you can experience the final result.

How is it different from LASIK?

The main difference is that in LASIK, a partial thickness flap is made in the cornea which is reflected back to expose the corneal bed. In all procedures, the laser reshapes the cornea once the outer layer has been removed or folded back.

In LASIK, the partial thickness flap is reflected back once the re-shaping has been completed and in this way, tricks the eye into thinking nothing has happened which explains the much quicker recovery time with LASIK compared with LASEK / PRK.

The recovery time, which can be days or weeks compares to just a few hours after LASIK. In addition, there is a reasonable amount of discomfort after this treatment, especially in the first few days as the top layer regenerates which is not the case with LASIK. Given that pain levels are lower and recovery times are quicker, we choose to perform LASIK wherever possible.

Dr Mearza came recommended from my opthalmologist for my laser vision correction surgery. He and his staff were great from start to finish and within one month of contacting him for my initial consultation I have better than 20/20 in both eyes.

I had LASEK on one and LASIK on the other. LASIK is a dream, you can see perfectly without any pain within a few hours of the surgery. LASEK was a bit more recovery time (3 days for pain to subside fully, and vision about a week to catch up) but manageable. The surgery only takes 2 mins per eye and Dr Mearza is very reassuring throughout. Great experience, would recommend him to everyone who wants to ditch their contacts and/or glasses.

Deniz

LASEK

Dr Mearza came recommended from my opthalmologist for my laser vision correction surgery. He and his staff were great from start to finish and within one month of contacting him for my initial consultation I have better than 20/20 in both eyes.

I had LASEK on one and LASIK on the other. LASIK is a dream, you can see perfectly without any pain within a few hours of the surgery. LASEK was a bit more recovery time (3 days for pain to subside fully, and vision about a week to catch up) but manageable. The surgery only takes 2 mins per eye and Dr Mearza is very reassuring throughout. Great experience, would recommend him to everyone who wants to ditch their contacts and/or glasses.

Deniz

LASEK